Stop and observe

When clients first come to us with their ideas and challenges, it’s usually easy for us to see what we think they need.

They need a plan, they need goals, they need fresh ideas, new strategies. We tell ourselves they need to take action and be strategic about it. They need our formula for growth, our tested process, to get with our program.

What would it look like if we slowed down and took the time to observe our clients before we made recommendations? If we look to answer not what they need but who they are. Behind the external goals, the missions and visions, what do they fear, where are their blocks?

Our interaction with them becomes about taking them from who they are now to who they want to become. After each action we help them take, what if we simply stopped to observe and asked ourselves is this taking them one step closer to who they want to become?

Staying the course

I'm for freedom

I'm for balance.

I'm for working only with my ideal clients. And referring on when I believe there is someone who can serve a client better.

I'm for getting everything on the table. The good, the bad, the ugly.

I'm for hypothesis. For trying new things. For making mistakes just so you can do it differently next time. 

When things are tough, it can help to remember why you started this in the first place.

Stay the course. You got this.

Working with what's known

Much of what we do as marketers is to work from what we know.

When we begin, much of what we have is merely hypothesis. A series of questions we pose for our audiences to then answer.

We need to take each question, hold it up to the light, test it in a range of conditions until we can gather enough information to derive some level of truth. We start to expand what is known.

Sometimes we forget this. When we view them in isolation, our marketing campaigns can seem like nothing more than failed experiments.

It’s only when you view them side by side, in relationship to one another and how each informs the next, that you can start to see your strategic trajectory take form.

Sometimes we all need a reminder of just how far we’ve come.